Interviewed by Dr. Rick Holland | Aug 16, 2011

Dr. Rick – Ramona, please give us some of your background. Tell us where you studied music, maybe some of your biggest influences as a student of music.

Ramona – I grew up in Bombay, India where I had most of my formal musical training. Born into a musician‚Äôs family I was fortunate to have had private piano lessons in classical music twice a week starting at the age of six. In addition to practicing the instrument, assignments in music theory and history were aplenty. In junior high I got good enough to sub at school for the music teacher when she called in sick ūüôā This was my first solo gig playing experience, it was stress-free and a lot of fun. My listening and playing revolved around classical music during these years; in particular I enjoyed practicing Bach, Debussy and Bartok. Aside from some Brubeck and Jobim albums that were part of my Dad‚Äôs collection, I wasn‚Äôt really exposed to much jazz then. I also grew up listening to church music – Anglican hymns, psalms and choral works, and at sixteen was pumping the pedals of the old reed organ at church during choir practices and services. Hearing such rich harmonies and elegant vocal parts may have been instrumental in steering me toward the multi-layered, polyphonic style of writing I do today. Lastly there was an ubiquitous presence of film music in the background, which my father, a studio musician and arranger wrote ‚Äď a blend of traditional and folk music tailored for Bollywood films. So while I didn‚Äôt actively study or play it, I was exposed to a fair amount of Indian folk and classical music. Later as a teenager, I heard Corea‚Äôs ‚ÄėLight As A Feather‚Äô which may have been instrumental in changing my focus from classical music to the unknown and infinitely more challenging world of jazz and improvisation. I‚Äôd say my best teachers were all the jazz players whose music I transcribed, analyzed and tried to imitate.

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